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Posts in Taxes.
Tax Implications of PPP Loan Forgiveness

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans taken out in connection with the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis that were subsequently forgiven raise a number of tax questions. A PPP loan may be forgiven in an amount equal to the sum of: (1) payroll costs; (2) interest (but not principal) payments on covered mortgage obligations (for mortgages before February 15, 2020); (3) any payment for any covered rent obligation (for leases beginning before February 15, 2020); (4) covered utility payments (for utilities that were turned on before February 15, 2020), during the covered period.

The IRS Chief Counsel’s Informal Guidance Clarifies Some Issues Left Open after Notice 2020-65 Regarding the “Payroll Tax Holiday”

IRS Office of Chief Counsel monthly payroll industry call on September 3, 2020

In addition to Notice 2020-65 and Instructions to Form 941 which we outlined in our recent blog, the IRS Office of Chief Counsel for employee benefits, exempt organizations and employment tax provided informal but insightful guidance on its monthly IRS payroll industry call held on September 3, 2020. The informal guidance was directed in part toward clearing up confusion that remained even after the IRS’s issuance of Notice 2020-65 over whether, or to what extent, employers could simply ignore the “payroll tax holiday” created by the President’s August 8, 2020, Executive Order.

IRS Releases Instructions to Form 941 Expanding on Prior Guidance on Deferral of Social Security Tax

On October 1, 2020, the IRS released instructions for Form 941 providing additional guidelines for reporting deferred Social Security taxes pursuant to the President's Memorandum (discussed previously on our blog) and IRS Notice 2020-65

Background

On August 8, 2020, the Presidential Memorandum directed the Secretary of the Treasury to use his authority pursuant to section 7508A of the Internal Revenue Code to defer the withholding, deposit, and payment of certain payroll tax obligations.

IRS Guidance - President's Memorandum Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations for Four Months

On August 8, 2020, President Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum directing the Treasury Department to defer the employee's portion of Social Security taxes due to the COVID-19 pandemic for wages paid from September 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 (see our blog). The deferral applies only for wages less than $4,000 for any bi-weekly period, or the equivalent any other pay period.

President's Memorandum to the Secretary of Treasury Defers Payroll Tax Obligations for Four Months

On August 8, President Donald J. Trump, signed the memorandum (the President’s Memorandum) directing the Secretary of Treasury to defer the withholding, deposit, and payment of the 6.2 percent payroll tax during the period of September 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 for wages less than $4,000 during any bi-weekly pay period (i.e., $104,000 annually) on a pre-tax basis. The Department of the Treasury is expected to provide additional guidance later in August.

COVID-19 Economic Relief Investigations: They Will Expose Some Businesses to Civil Liability

The initial rounds of COVID-19 economic relief have largely been depleted. More rounds of relief are expected soon. Further out, there will be investigations and follow-on civil (and criminal) proceedings surrounding this largest-ever economic stimulus package in U.S. history, with almost $350 billion going to small businesses.

Timing IS Everything When Investing in Qualified Opportunity Funds

We have now received our second round of regulations interpreting Section 1400z-2, also known as the investment in Opportunity Zones section of the Internal Revenue Code. In our previous posts, we have provided background and tracked important developments with the program. Now and in future posts, we will highlight finer points that stakeholders should be aware of when considering the program.

Opportunity Funds are Knocking: Let them in and Learn How They Can Work for You: Q & A

This is the next post in a series of articles diving into the new “Opportunity Fund” program. In previous posts, we described the general framework for the new Opportunity Fund program, the tax benefits to taxpayers who invest in Opportunity Funds, and how the funds work. Now, we will answer some of the more common questions we have been receiving regarding the program.

Q: How does an Opportunity Fund become eligible to be an Opportunity Fund?

A: It is pretty simple. There are two general requirements.  First, an Opportunity Fund must be organized for the purpose of investing in Qualified Opportunity Zone Property.

January 2, 2018
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Topics Taxes
How Tax Reform May Impact You

Congress has passed tax reform and President Trump has signed the bill into law. Consequently, the tax code will be dramatically changed for many. Although there are many uncertainties in how the implementing regulations and rules will look, many businesses and certain industries will significantly benefit. There will be ample tax planning opportunities, and we have provided the major highlights to get you started. 

Specifically, we have organized the highlights into four groups. The first is for real estate businesses and is applicable to businesses generally. This section talks about the 20% deduction for pass-through businesses like partnership and S-corporations. The second group is geared toward all employers and contains a significant tax credit for paying employees on FMLA. The third group provides the relevant provisions applicable to tax-exempt organizations such as an excise tax to the entity on excessive compensation. Lastly, there is something for everyone as we pulled out highlights pertaining to almost all of us individually.