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Our business blog focuses on issues affecting Virginia, D.C. and Maryland business owners as well as those in other jurisdictions throughout the country. We provide timely insight and commentary on federal and state rules and how they affect you. If you are interested in having us cover a specific topic, please let us know.

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Posts in Taxes.

We have now received our second round of regulations interpreting Section 1400z-2, also known as the investment in Opportunity Zones section of the Internal Revenue Code. In our previous posts, we have provided background and tracked important developments with the program. Now and in future posts, we will highlight finer points that stakeholders should be aware of when considering the program.

This is the next post in a series of articles diving into the new “Opportunity Fund” program. In previous posts, we described the general framework for the new Opportunity Fund program, the tax benefits to taxpayers who invest in Opportunity Funds, and how the funds work. Now, we will answer some of the more common questions we have been receiving regarding the program.

Q: How does an Opportunity Fund become eligible to be an Opportunity Fund?

A: It is pretty simple. There are two general requirements.  First, an Opportunity Fund must be organized for the purpose of investing in Qualified Opportunity Zone Property.

January 2, 2018
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Topics Taxes

Congress has passed tax reform and President Trump has signed the bill into law. Consequently, the tax code will be dramatically changed for many. Although there are many uncertainties in how the implementing regulations and rules will look, many businesses and certain industries will significantly benefit. There will be ample tax planning opportunities, and we have provided the major highlights to get you started. 

Specifically, we have organized the highlights into four groups. The first is for real estate businesses and is applicable to businesses generally. This section talks about the 20% deduction for pass-through businesses like partnership and S-corporations. The second group is geared toward all employers and contains a significant tax credit for paying employees on FMLA. The third group provides the relevant provisions applicable to tax-exempt organizations such as an excise tax to the entity on excessive compensation. Lastly, there is something for everyone as we pulled out highlights pertaining to almost all of us individually.