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  • Posts by Maureen Carr
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    Maureen E. Carr is a shareholder of Bean, Kinney & Korman. She focuses her practice on employment law and commercial litigation and is known for her legal acumen and responsiveness.

    Employment Law

    Understanding and staying current ...

To be exempt from the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), an employee must perform certain duties and be paid on a “salary basis,” meaning that the employee receives a set salary each week, regardless of the number of days or hours worked, with limited exceptions. Under the FLSA, an employer may deduct from the pay of an exempt employee only under the following circumstances:

  • No work: When an exempt employee performs no work for an entire workweek, the employer is not required to pay the employee’s salary for that week.
March 16, 2018
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Topics Employment

A previous blog post discussed sexual harassment in the workplace. This post discusses steps that an employer can take to avoid liability for sexual harassment, or at least minimize legal exposure.

1. Have a Sexual Harassment Policy

An employer should have a clearly articulated sexual harassment policy that:

  • expressly prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace;
  • defines and provides examples of sexual harassment;
  • establishes the scope of the policy in relation to employees and third parties; and
  • establishes a complaint procedure for victims or observers of sexual harassment. 

Recently, the #MeToo movement has cast a spotlight on sexual harassment in the workplace. Despite the media focus on sexual harassment, there still seems to be a fair amount of confusion about what is and is not sexual harassment.

Simply put, sexual harassment is harassment based on an individual’s sex. For legal purposes, sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, written or physical conduct of a sexual nature that:

  1. affects an individual’s employment,
  2. unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance, or
  3. creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment.

In today’s global economy, it has become increasingly common for companies based in the United States to engage workers who live abroad for various purposes. U.S. companies often classify these workers as “independent contractors” to avoid having to navigate the employment landscape in other countries. However, U.S. companies should be aware of the potential pitfalls of misclassifying foreign workers, particularly in countries where employment laws tend to be more employee-friendly than U.S. law. Employers should consider the following factors when engaging foreign independent contractors to work abroad.

Like it or not, Donald Trump is the 45th President of the United States of America.  Now that the initial shock has worn off, it’s time to evaluate how federal employment laws, regulations, and enforcement may shift under the Trump Administration. 

While President Trump has not spoken at length regarding employment law since taking office, his pro-business philosophy and nomination of Andrew F. Puzder, a former restaurant executive, for Secretary of Labor (Puzder later withdrew his name from consideration) suggests that the Trump Administration will be significantly more employer-friendly than the Obama Administration