About

As employment law constantly changes, the attorneys at Bean, Kinney & Korman stay up to date on the law as it develops. Our blog topics focus on those changes and what you need to know about them, ranging from severance agreements and the FLSA to social media in the workplace and recent court decisions. If you are interested in having us cover a specific topic, please let us know.

Contact Us

Topics

Archives

Select Month:

Contributors

Posts in HR Policies.
Bean, Kinney & Korman:  Helping to Develop Cost-Effective COVID-19 Workplace Safety Policies and Procedures that Meet Virginia's New Regulatory Requirements and OSHA, CDC Guidelines

With COVID-19 vaccines becoming more readily available in the U.S. and a larger percentage of individuals having been vaccinated, businesses are beginning to reopen or expand in-the-office activity in Northern Virginia and across the Commonwealth. Businesses, both large and small, should be giving serious thought to the COVID-19 workplace safety policies and procedures that all are required to have in place to achieve appropriate workplace safety for employees and customers whenever re-opening day arrives.

Complying with the District of Columbia's Accrued Sick and Safe Leave Requirements

For employers located in the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, keeping up with multiple states’ employment law requirements can be challenging. Virginia closely tracks the federal laws that govern employers on issues such as the Family Medical Leave Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, with only some minor variations, while Maryland mandates employee leave that deviates from both federal law and District of Columbia law.

The Risks of Using In-House Counsel to Conduct Internal Investigations

While employers strive to minimize the occurrence workplace conflicts, complaints about employee conduct may still arise. When the complaint involves allegations of discrimination or other unlawful conduct, it is important for the employer to promptly and thoroughly investigate the complaint and take appropriate action if the complaint is substantiated.

To manage these investigations, some employers rely on their in-house counsel. However, there are potential downsides to using in-house counsel as the first line of defense when investigating an employee complaint.

Thinking About Hiring an Unpaid Summer Intern?

With another summer approaching, you may be considering hiring an unpaid intern for the summer months. The process for doing so seems cut and dry. However, litigation around unpaid internships has recently increased due to several lawsuits where interns sued their former employers alleging violations of state and federal wage and hour laws by failing to pay interns for work that should have been performed by paid employees.

To determine whether your intern is entitled to minimum wage or overtime, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proffered a seven-factor “primary beneficiary test.”  

Virginia Adds a "Ban the Box" Law for Pot Possession

Ban-the-box restrictions have increased in popularity among U.S. states and localities during the last decade. “Ban the box” refers to laws that variously prohibit or restrict employers from requiring applicants for employment to divulge their criminal history through a check box on an application for employment. The theory behind “ban the box” statutes is that they promote hiring practices that give applicants a fair chance and require employers to judge individual job candidates on their merits, instead of automatically disqualifying those who have a criminal history.

Employees in Virginia are Heading Back to the Workplace. What Can Employers Ask or Do?

On May 8, 2020, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam issued an Executive Order implementing Phase One of his plan to ease many of the current COVID-19-related restrictions on businesses and public activities for most jurisdictions in the Commonwealth, effective as of May 15, 2020. But not in Northern Virginia, where the region has yet to achieve the COVID-19 benchmarks that led to Northam’s easing of business and public activity restrictions elsewhere in Virginia. 

OFCCP Final Rule Prohibits Pay Secrecy Policies by Federal Contractors

Federal contractors, take notice: did you know that it is now illegal as a federal contractor to prevent your employees from discussing their compensation? The Department of Labor’s recent ruling may significantly impact your business and necessitate changes to your policies and practices. Continue reading to determine whether your business will be affected and how.

In a landmark decision on Thursday, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “Board”), by a 3-2 vote, determined that its long-standing “joint-employment jurisprudence” had grown “increasingly out of step with changing economic circumstances, particularly the recent dramatic growth in contingent employment relationships, i.e., shift work, contract workers, and temporary employee relationships[,]” across the U.S.

Virginia Employers’ Liability for Armed Security Guards and Workplace Violence

Workplace violence has become a growing concern for businesses across the country. In Virginia, employers of all sizes are actively considering, many for the first time, whether it would be prudent to have extra security personnel on hand and wondering whether they can be held liable for actions taken by security guards on their premises. The good news for employers in the Commonwealth is that such liability can be mitigated with the right policies in place.

Employer Risks in Using Employment-Related Criminal Background Checks, Part 2

Part 1 of this article can be found here.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act

Having considering the perils summarized above, an employer who still decides to use employee criminal background checks faces additional restrictions under other federal statutory provisions, namely the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”). An employer who uses consumer reports to make employment decisions, including hiring, retention, promotion or reassignment, must comply with the FCRA. The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) enforces the FCRA.