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As employment law constantly changes, the attorneys at Bean, Kinney & Korman stay up to date on the law as it develops. Our blog topics focus on those changes and what you need to know about them, ranging from severance agreements and the FLSA to social media in the workplace and recent court decisions. If you are interested in having us cover a specific topic, please let us know.

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DOL Final Rule: Employers Can Pay Bonuses and Premium Pay Under FLSA Fluctuating Workweek Compensation

On May 20, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a new final rule clarifying that employers are permitted to pay bonuses or other incentive-based pay to salaried, nonexempt employees whose hours vary from week to week. Such bonus or premium pay, on top of the fixed salary paid to an employee, are compatible with the use of the so-called “fluctuating workweek” method of compensation under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The DOL issued the final rule to highlight the flexibility that employers have to provide bonuses or other forms of additional compensation under the fluctuating work method of compensation and to clear up the differing judicial opinions that have resulted from the DOL’s past guidance. 

Editor's note: A federal district court has granted a preliminary injunction blocking the overtime rule from taking effect December 1, 2016.

The U.S. Department of Labor will today unveil new regulations effectuating significant changes to the payment of employee overtime under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The new rule will raise the salary exemption threshold for overtime pay under the FLSA from its current rate of $23, 660 a year to  $47,476 annually. Also raised under the new rule will be the total annual compensation level above which highly compensated white collar workers will be ineligible for overtime from the current $100,000 to $134,004 a year. The adjustments in the salary exemption thresholds will be the first since 2004 and only the third in the last four decades. The DOL estimates that the new rule will result in overtime eligibility for an additional 4.2 million additional workers nationwide.

The overtime salary exemption thresholds will be subject to automatic adjustment every three years, beginning on January 1, 2020, to raise the threshold to match the 40th percentile of full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage Census Region. The new rule is set to go into effect on December 1, 2016.

You can view the the DOL's overview and summary of the final rule here.

DOL Releases Proposed FLSA Overtime Regulation Amendments

The Department of Labor (DOL) has just released its long-awaited Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to the white collar exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The amendments, if passed, will significantly increase the minimum salary test (from $23,660 to $50,440) for hours worked over 40 in a work week. The amendments will have far-reaching impacts on many industries that will need to reclassify many currently exempt employees and corresponding wage and hour policies.

PunchingTimeClock.jpgThe Case

On March 7, 2014, Judge Raymond Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia denied Dollar Tree’s motion for de-certification of a Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) class action case involving between 4,000 and 6,000 current and former employees. The lawsuit alleges that Dollar Tree required or permitted its hourly associates and assistant store managers to work "off the clock" and overtime without compensation. The suit covers employees in Dollar Tree stores located in 48 states and the District of Columbia. Dollar Tree’s headquarters is located in Norfolk, Virginia.