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As employment law constantly changes, the attorneys at Bean, Kinney & Korman stay up to date on the law as it develops. Our blog topics focus on those changes and what you need to know about them, ranging from severance agreements and the FLSA to social media in the workplace and recent court decisions. If you are interested in having us cover a specific topic, please let us know.

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Posts tagged pregnant.

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The Pregnancy Discrimination Act requires that employers treat pregnant employees the same as non-pregnant employees who suffer from some injury or sickness that occurred outside of work. 

In our last post, we reviewed the D.C. Fire Department’s change to their pregnancy policy.  In this post we take a look at what the Pregnancy Discrimination Act requires. 

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act:  A Brief History

In 1976, the U.S. Supreme Court found that under Title VII, discrimination based on pregnancy was not sex discrimination.  Unhappy with this interpretation, Congress passed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) which became law in 1978.  The PDA amended Title VII and specified that sex discrimination does include discrimination on the basis of pregnancy.

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Earlier this week, D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department changed its policy regarding pregnant firefighters.  The change limits pregnant firefighters to 30-days of light duty during and after pregnancy.

Tom Sherwood from NBC 4 in Washington, DC reports

In a move to cut overtime and other administrative costs, the department is now limiting pregnant firefighters to 30 days of light duty or desk duty during a pregnancy.  After that, the employee must use accrued sick leave or annual leave to cover the rest of the pregnancy or any post pregnancy time off...

Under the old policy, a pregnant firefighter might work several months on light duty until she was due to give birth.  Under the new policy, the firefighter could face several months of no pay at all.