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This blog focuses on real estate, land use and construction-related topics affecting Virginia and the Washington, D.C. metro area. With topics ranging from contract drafting and negotiation to local and regional land use project updates, the attorneys at Bean, Kinney & Korman provide timely insight and commentary on the issues affecting owners, builders, developers, contractors, subcontractors and other players in the industry. If you are interested in having us cover a specific topic, please let us know.

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Posts from May 2019.

In Part 1 of this series, the definition of guaranty and the means for landlords to enforce guaranties was discussed.

Recognizing that the guaranty is a condition to entering into a lease, and its leverage is limited, the guarantor would still like to limit its exposure under a long-term lease. At the same time, the landlord wants the security of an unlimited and unconditional guaranty, at least until such time as the tenant has a track record of success or can provide better financials. Because these competing interests are critical business terms, any attempts at limiting the guaranty need to be raised early in the lease negotiation process by tenant and preferably at the time of the negotiation of the letter of intent.

As a condition to entering into a new lease, landlords often require a guaranty of lease from a personal or corporate guarantor in connection with those tenant entities that do not have either a high enough net worth or annual revenue, or for whatever other reasons do not meet the landlord’s financial criteria. A guaranty of lease is a covenant by the guarantor to be responsible for the obligations of the tenant. For example, for a tenant business set up as a new limited liability company that has one or two principal owners, the landlord will likely require that the owners personally guaranty the tenant’s obligations under the lease since the limited liability company would have little or no assets and no track record. Or for a tenant entity that is a wholly owned subsidiary of a parent corporation, the landlord will likely require that the parent corporation serve as the guarantor.