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Posts tagged fraud in the inducement.

Last month, we looked at Station #2, where the Virginia Supreme Court refused to turn a breach of contract allegations into a fraud claim. Contrast that with Nathan, et al. v. Long & Foster, Real Estate, Inc., et al., in which the Circuit Court for the City of Roanoke has allowed a fraud in the inducement claim to go forward.

Geeta Nathan and Santam Singh were looking to buy a home in Roanoke, and worked with Barbara Michelsen, a Long & Foster real estate agent. They signed a Purchase Agreement to buy a home for $260,000, and the agreement listed Michelsen as the selling agent.

The Virginia Supreme Court recently gave us yet another example of a breach of contract case that couldn’t rise to a fraud in the inducement claim in Station #2, LLC v. Lynch, et al., Record No. 091410.

In Station #2, the Lynches owned a three-story building in the City of Roanoke. They sold the top two floors to 237 Granby LLC in order to convert the floors to condos. The Lynches then leased the ground floor to Station #2 so it could operate a restaurant with live music and other entertainment. The lease between the Lynches and Station #2 required Station #2 to install soundproofing material in the void space between Station #2’s ceiling and the lower level of 237 Granby’s condos. 237 Granby’s agent agreed to allow Station #2 access to the void space, but the company hired by the agent to renovate and develop the condos closed off the void space before Station #2 could soundproof.