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As reported by the National Restaurant Association and other industry experts, there are over one million restaurants in the US, but the failure rate is very high (a majority close within three to five years). With online shopping and delivery becoming more and more prevalent, landlords of all types have faced increasing vacancies for traditional retail stores. As a landlord of an office, mixed use, shopping center or stand-alone retail pad seeking to fill a vacancy, there are five important factors to consider before marketing the property or executing a lease agreement with a restaurant.

Part one of this post will explain acceleration of rent provisions and how various courts around the country have scrutinized these provisions and taken varying positions on their enforceability. Part two of this post will discuss how landlords can include enforceable acceleration of rent provisions in their commercial leases.

What is an Acceleration of Rent Provision?

An acceleration of rent provision gives the landlord the right, after a default by the tenant, to demand the entire balance of the unpaid rent owed under the lease for the entire remainder of the term to be paid in one lump sum. Under the law of most states, if there is no acceleration of rents provision, the landlord is typically entitled only to collect rent from the tenant as it becomes due under the lease each month for the remainder of the term.

In Part I of this blog post, we discussed the varied interests of the landlord and the tenant's lender in the tenant’s personal property located at the premises in the context of a commercial lease.  Part II below will discuss suggested compromise solutions and a typical landlord waiver. 

October 29, 2010
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An earlier blog post focused on important issues relating to the Letter of Intent. Assuming now that you have gotten past the letter of intent stage and are moving forward to a binding lease agreement, we will now focus on common legal issues reviewed from the tenant’s perspective. If your current lease is up for renewal or you are in the market for new space, the following is a list of important but basic issues to address with your attorney in connection with any successful lease negotiation with your landlord. 

This Part I will focus on basic provisions such as assignment/subletting, use restrictions and the commencement date, and Part II will address other issues including insurance, mutual waivers and defaults.